Say Hi To Ellen

Folks, this is Ellen. She is the first elephant seal pup of the season to arrive at California Wildlife Center, and she just arrived last Thursday. (Photo sent by KB.)

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That photo debuted on our CO FB page and was spotted by Alma A., who had some photos of her own to share with us. “Here are some pictures that I took while volunteering for the California Wildlife Center (CWC) in 2013. That year, we were able to rehabilitate 6 elephant seal pups that came to the center sick and malnourished. It was a great experience for both the staff and the volunteers involved in this project.”

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Comments

  1. YAY for those kind hoomins and their blorpy rescues! <3 <3 <3

  2. From one Ellen to another – you are such a cutie – good luck in rehab and release!

  3. What a timely post! It is harbor seal and elephant seal pupping season in the US. Leave seals be. If you see a baby seal alone on the beach, do not approach or touch it. Mom might be out hunting for a quick snack, but she will abandon her pup if she is scared for her safety and sees a well-meaning human or curious dog near her baby (seals are very cautious on land). If you are concerned about a pup, call your local animal rehabilitation center. All US coastline has an assigned marine mammal rehab facility. **The more you know** :-) [I volunteer at The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, CA]

  4. Moonstar says:

    Stupid question, but what’s the blue stuff on the seal’s head in the first pic?

  5. Smartypants says:

    Moonstar, I thought it was a reflection from a neon light, but it might be nontoxic paint – I know some places differentiate their animals w/different colors.

  6. Moonstar, and anyone else who is interested: the blue stuff on the seal’s head is a non-toxic paint. Rehab facilities have individualized veterinary plans for every animal in their care, and this is an easy way for staff to tell each newly admitted seal apart before more permanent tagging. (Marine mammals are often tagged with serial numbers on their flippers so facilities have their full medical history for tracking purposes and in case they re-strand.)

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