‘Tocktober 1st /// 24 Hours Of ‘Tocks /// 12:12 pm PT

What we have here, People..is a Patagonian Cavy. The, uh, business end of a Patagonian Cavy, that ees.


24 Hours Of ‘Tocks…continues.

Comments

  1. Stressfactor says:

    And how many people went and Googled a Patagonian Cavy to find out what the… uh… non-business end… of one looked like?

  2. skippymom says:

    *raising hand*
    I think it’s a cousin of the Jackalope.

  3. *raises hand also* d’awwww…. he’s a cutie!

  4. Me.

  5. I just saw one at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, so I knew exactly what the other end looked like!

  6. *raises hand* I did! Wait, does it count as “googled” if I used Wikipedia?

  7. Ooh, the mod lounge. I see someone brought peppermint tea…

  8. i was just going to say the same thing

    and this one is apparently a wee bairn of a cavy jackalope

  9. skippymom says:

    Hey, have we ever had a jackalope on CO? And if not, why not?

  10. They really don’t like having their picture taken?

  11. Stunbunny says:

    Thanks CO! for making me smarter by one animals!

  12. Cutie, a cross between a jack rabbit and small deer. Really different in a good sort a way!

  13. I think it’s a Wolpertinger ! :P

  14. Adorable!
    Would that my mother was still alive, when I was a kid, I couldn’t say “ass” or even “butt” – only “bottom” or “behind”…I think mom might have allowed “tocks”.

  15. skippymom says:

    Ooh, that is so much cooler!

  16. skippymom says:

    My grandmother used to say “fanny”, but we have to be careful with that one around British people.

  17. Fird Birfle says:

    our term of euphemism was “bahunkus”.

    Also, we were emphatically *NOT ALLOWED* to say “shut up”….
    Never mind that term of Satan: “whatever”.

  18. with fresh mint!

  19. Oh my gosh! Here is the front of the dahlings! Squeeeee!

    http://www.zooborns.com/.a/6a010535647bf3970b0133f34fe435970b-800wi

  20. They’re actually very shy and usually only come out in the figments of imagination.

  21. I can’t decide which is cuter, the south end of a cavy going north, or the north end of a cavy going south. In any event, let’s give them lots of latitude for their power of Qte.

  22. Same two allowed here. Mom would never have allowed “tocks.” But we did use a Greek combination (due to next door neighbors) that sounded like “bee-so ni-kee” which I can’t find a full translation for. (The first part means “behind” or “back” though.) Any Greeks out there? :-)
    For my students we use “derriere” since some things just sound more refined en français! :-)

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