Ono-mato-poeia!

Baroo?! Ehn! Yeing, yeing, yeing Cronche! Snorgle.

A fabu list of animal sounds from "many lands" was corralled by Rebecca I. How does a Danish person imitate a baby chicken? "Pip pip!" How do the Japanese imitate a mouse squeaking? "chu chu" of course! Duh.

Click to find see he entire Animal noise page!

Comments

  1. Yay!
    (Huh?)

  2. aww that mustve taken forever to make!

  3. Now I can make animal sounds from around the world, too funny!

  4. Carlisa says:

    Wow, check it out. Babel Fish for animals.

  5. Courtney says:

    The french think a duck says “coin coin” and a pig says “groin groin”. That’s awesome. :)

  6. You’re all impressed about the page content… I’m in shock about the person’s webpage that it’s on – I know him!

    Is there anything that he /doesn’t/ put on his work webpage (he’s an academic in electrical engineering)?

    Wow.

    However, he hasn’t included any tapir noises :)

  7. plunkatone says:

    But HOW do you pronounce “nyerhe”!?

  8. Tapir noises!!

    That’s what we need.

    captainpotato, we dispatch you to investigate.

  9. We need animal noises in Portuguese, too!

    Brazilian bee noise: “zum-zum.”

  10. The blanks tell as much about the language and its people as the sounds. English had blanks only for:

    moose noises (the Swedes were the only ones who had a moose noise)
    go away dog (we lof da puppers)
    go away bird
    come here chicken

    But we do have entries for go away cat (though I would *never*…) AND–>>English has pet names in EVERY single animal category.

    How cool is that, huh?! We LOFS our nanimals in very vocal ways.

  11. Yay – now I can talk to animals of other countries ;)

  12. Is SOMEBODY yay-ing about being first? tsktsk or about the webpage?

  13. jaypos, somehow it seems to me that the English words/terms are filled in mainly because the person who created that chart is a native speaker of English… seriously.

    If they were French or Albanian, the thing would look completely different. (Especially given the French habit of taking pets *everywhere.*)

  14. Yikes – typo.

    Make that “jaypo.”

  15. EC, the webmeister acknowledges a bevy of international native speakers at the top, so I assumed he had plenty of dependable primary sources. But you never know… Maybe they just weren’t as enthusiastic about filling the chart in as he was. Your point is well taken.

  16. Did the caption here remind anyone else of Todd Rundgren?

    Just sayin’.

  17. EC, you could rewrite that as “taypo.” But there’s still only one o’ me…

  18. But I made you plural…

  19. A Brazilian friend told me that they’ve forgotten the Portuguese words for animal sounds, partly from having lived outside of Brazil for a long time… I bet that’s commoner (among immigrant groups) than we might assume.

  20. Good to see something so worthwhile coming out of my old university. This may be humble Adelaide’s finest contribution to the world… Take a bow!

  21. I intend to commit all versions of the ‘come here cat’ command to memory.

  22. JessJess says:

    That is a very dangerous site for a girl like myself who is already known for meowing, mooing, and oinking…

    MEOW!

  23. Alice — SOMEBODY was suggesting a possible next element of an emerging pattern.
    “Baroo?! Ehn! Yeing, yeing, yeing Cronche! Snorgle.” …Yay!
    Geesh.

  24. “I intend to commit all versions of the ‘come here cat’ command to memory.”

    Somehow I think cats will be largely indifferent to your newfound powers, Aubrey. ;)

  25. Theo – darn, I tewtelly wanted excuse to go “yay” if I ever get here first… ;)

    Do deer really make sounds? “Troat”?! according to list.

  26. You never know, EC – should I ever come across a linguistically empowered cat, you can bet I’ll be saying kissar-kissar, mietz mietz, cic cic, etc. – whatever works!

  27. Michele says:

    Jaypo- do you remember in Princess Diaries when the hairstylist puts Anne Hathaway’s hair in this totally goofy ‘do, and shes all “I look. Like a moose!” so hes like “but a very cute moose! Make all the boy moose say ‘hwaaanh!'” so, that must be the English word for moose verbage. “Hwaaanh!”

  28. wow, the list is detailed – with camel sounds – I can’t say I’ve ever had the occasion to do that one. Or the sound of a crane.

  29. “Come over here” works pretty well for my cat, but that’s only because he feels like it…. ;)

  30. my best friend’s mom says “CHAT” (cat in Franch) for “go away cat!”

  31. AuntieMame says:

    Somehow “pissy pissy” sounds so appropriate for a cat…

  32. “Tapir noises!!

    That’s what we need.

    captainpotato, we dispatch you to investigate.”

    I know very well how they sound, but writing it is another matter. Imagine a very high pitched “heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeek” or “fweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee”

  33. “Tapir noises!!

    That’s what we need.

    captainpotato, we dispatch you to investigate.”

    I know very well how they sound, but writing it is another matter. Imagine a very high pitched “heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeek” or “fweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee”

  34. Damn double posts… CO doesn’t like Opera, it seems.

    “Good to see something so worthwhile coming out of my old university. This may be humble Adelaide’s finest contribution to the world… Take a bow!”

    Don’t forget Professor Mike Tyler, the world-renowned frog sniffer, who won an IgNobel award a few months ago.

  35. I had no idea us English speaking folks had a sound for camel nuzzing. “Grumph” LOL

  36. Gosh, the tapir noises sound cute…

    And Aubrey, you don’t need all those commands for “come here cat”–all you need is the Finger of Friendship, or whatever Theo called it.

    Cats cannot resist sniffing a proffered finger that is just outside their reach. Keep moving it toward you, and you will trawl that cat in like a fish on a line.

    Works every time.

  37. aahh, the FoF (Finger of Friendship). indeed, A thinker, your words are true. it does work everytime. I’ve seen cats following the FoF against their will, as if hypnotized.

  38. AuntieMame says:

    Just make sure your reflexes are faster than the cat’s, or it may become the Finger of Lunch.

  39. mariser says:

    AM,

    “Finger of Lunch”
    ya know, I *almost* spit water all over my keyboard. I can tewtally see some cat lunging at a poor soul’s extended finger.

  40. It’s missing from the chart, but English does have a word for go away dog: GIT.

  41. list is not entirely without errors though. I wonder how they obtained their data

  42. ralph says: “It’s missing from the chart, but English does have a word for go away dog: GIT.”

    That’s right – as in, “Gwan! Git!”

  43. Actually, I know of a cat who is fascinated by my feet, and will always keep me from walking by rolling over on first one, then the other foot. So I might possibly possess the Feet of Temptation.

  44. I knew a cat who would continually follow you, right behind your feet, anytime you went outside (she was the neighbour’s cat). The only way to shake her was by walking in rapid little circles, and make your getaway when she stopped and looked around, confused.

  45. mariser says:

    I am:

    …trying to imagine A Thinker
    “walking in rapid little circles”…
    unable to. collapsing in floor from exhaustion/lack of imagination.

  46. ?!

    not sure I get it.

    but it made me laugh.

  47. mariser says:

    I’m glad it made you laugh. is hard to explain why it is so hard for me to visualize, but I got a kick of the phrase .

  48. :-D

  49. When I first started French in high school, one of the first things we learned was the French words for animal sounds. Kind of a funny thing to learn right up front, since it didn’t seem as useful as, say, “Where is the bathroom?” or “Fire!” I do remember there being fish on that list, though. I think it was “glou, glou.”

  50. AuntieMame says:

    “Où est la salle de bain?”

    “Vous avez un pomme de terre en votre chaussure.”

    I remember that, but not how to say “Fire!”

  51. “You have a potato in your…” ?

    Feu! Feu!

  52. Oh, *shoe*.

    Yes, I can see that being an incredibly useful sentence. “Excuse me, sir…”

  53. “walking in rapid little circles, and make your getaway …”

    I, too, thought this was hilarious.

  54. A little three-year-old taught me this cute little song about baby chickens. She learned it from her nanny, a native Spanish speaker. Cutest song ever!
    “Los pollitos dicen
    Pio pio pio
    Cuando tienen hambre,
    Cuando tienen frio…”

    Also, I think my dove knows Spanish. I swear he says “cucurrucu” instead of “coo-coo”.

  55. margaret says:

    The three times i was in France, the kitties went MEENU, MEENU, unless the french people were just messing with me?

  56. Bellgirl says:

    I particularly like the fact that this is on the university of Adelaide’s SChool of Electrical and Electronic Engineering homepage. And did they get clearance from the Ethics Committee before interviewing all those animals?

  57. i really like the big crosslinguistic charts on the link you posted.

    here’s another “sounds of the world’s animals” link, from a linguist. it includes sound files of the actual animal noises!!

    http://www.georgetown.edu/faculty/ballc/animals/

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